Microsoft Snipping Tool

With the adjustments to our classroom environment caused by COVID-19, most of us have been forced to be much more creative and resourceful.  Throughout the past year, Cathy and I have had to create many teaching tools for our virtual and online learning environments.  From creating practice exercise templates and visual aids to help increase student engagement, we have utilized Microsoft’s snipping tool.  This free tool has added efficiency to creating our learning resources. This is a tool that we have used for years, but recently we were asked about recommending good “clip and paste” tools. 

Some of the reasons that we like to use the Microsoft snipping tool are:

  • This is a tool that is free and easy to use and is part of the Windows Operating System
  • A user can edit the clipped snapshots
  • Snipping Tool allows a user to write on the screen capture and save it
  • Captured images can be stored in many formats
  • After capturing the screen, it automatically gets copied and it can be immediately pasted into a document

The free Windows Snipping Tool allows users to do the following:

Free-form snipDraw a free-form shape around an object.
Rectangular snipDrag the cursor around an object to form a rectangle.
Window snipSelect a window, such as a dialog box, that you want to capture.
Full-screen snipCapture the entire screen.

There are several ways to begin using the Microsoft snipping tool, but the easiest way is to select the Shift, Windows button and the “S” keys.

For more information about the Microsoft clipping tool, visit:   https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/use-snipping-tool-to-capture-screenshots-00246869-1843-655f-f220-97299b865f6b

In addition to the free Windows snipping tool, we suggest using

  •  Or the print screen function and then pasting it into paint.

Begin using one of these snipping tools today and immediately improve your efficiency in creating documents for your classroom.

  © 2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Bring Your Course Content to Life with Wakelet!

If you are looking for a technology tool that will engage students and bring your course content to life, Wakelet is the tool!  Unlike some apps, there is only one version of Wakelet. The free version! Additionally, there are no limitations or required upgrades; instructors can create unlimited collections and spaces, invite an unlimited number of participants or contributors, and users can create multiple accounts if desired. 

Wakelet is easy to use and works seamlessly with most learning management systems. It also works with multiple other educational technology tools, such as Flipgrid (February 2018), Kahoot (November 2017), and Microsoft Teams (March 2018). It is accessible and inclusive. Partnered with Microsoft, Wakelet utilizes Microsoft’s Immersive Reader, which enhances accessibility and inclusivity in your courses. The text-to-speech reader is as simple as clicking an icon.  The Immersive Reader also provides language translation.

There are multiple ways to utilize Wakelet in a course. For instance, do you currently use student resource packets? You can easily convert these manual resource packets using Wakelet into engaging, online content.  Do you utilize Microsoft Teams with your students or colleagues? If so, you can share Wakelet Collections with team members. You can also bookmark or save links to your Wakelet Collections directly from Microsoft Teams.

Do you encourage students to become self-directed learners? If so, you can embed videos into Wakelet to explain a topic, allowing students to rewind and repeat the concepts as often as needed. You can even embed a self-assessment Kahoot quiz after a Wakelet learning activity. Allowing students to repeat assessments until they have mastered the concepts or have reached the assessment deadline. 

Flipgrid can also be used with Wakelet to create an engaging activity that facilitates class discussion. Create a discussion Q&A session or enhance your discussion board activities. This type of interactive engagement helps students improve their critical thinking and communication/collaboration skills. It also helps students learn to be concise with their responses.

Wakelet Spaces helps instructors get organized. For instance, you can organize your Flipgrid discussion responses by activity. This arrangement allows instructors to build a collection of discussion responses that students can use for future reflection activities. Additionally, today many students learn better when they can communicate verbally rather than in writing.  Wakelet, combined with Flipgrid, provides a simple way to give students oral formative assessments to showcase their knowledge.

Since many students use various mobile devices, Wakelet’s mobile app is convenient for students in remote learning environments. Mobile access allows students to collaborate across devices and from any location. Students can join a Wakelet Collection by scanning a QR Code, entering a Collection’s code, or pasting a Collection’s URL. Students can also utilize the app without creating a Wakelet account.  

From enhanced resource sharing, assessment, project collaboration to eFolios, Wakelet is a versatile tool that will enhance your teaching toolbox and improve your students’ learning experience. 

Are you ready to use this engaging technology tool? To get started, you can sign up for your free account at https://wakelet.com/. Be sure to check out Wakelet’s free templates and learning resources (blogs, guides, videos).

©2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

2020 Year End Review

Many of us are ready for 2020 to end and to turn the page to 2021.  As our semester and 2020 come to a close, we feel that it is a great opportunity to reflect upon the fantastic technology tools and topics that we explored throughout the year.  A great resolution for 2021 is to integrate one new tool into your classroom environment.

Mentimeterhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/01/

Grammarly https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/02/

Remote Learning Tools for Successhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/03/

Zoomhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/04/

Go Soap Boxhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/05/

Improve Your Virtual Meetings & Classroom Presentationshttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/06/

Accessibility Compliance Tools https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/07/31/

Futureproof Employees and Students with Data Analytics Training – https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/08/31/

Duet (Second Monitor Without a Cost)https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/09/30/

MURALhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/10/

Krisp for Noise Free Meetings & Recordings https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/11/

We look forward to exploring more teaching and learning technology tools throughout 2021.

© 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Krisp: For Noise Free Meetings and Video Recordings

Are you working remotely?  Are you trying to record lecture videos from home?  Are you frustrated by unexpected background noises, such as dogs barking, household noises, the neighbor’s lawnmower, etc.?  Then Krisp.ai is the must-have noise-canceling app that puts you back in control of providing a professional, noise-free background. 

The Krisp app utilizes AI (Artificial Intelligence) technology to distinguish between the human voice and unwanted background noise.  Not only can Krisp eliminate background noise on your side of a meeting or call, but it can also filter out unwanted noises coming from the other participants.   While meeting applications like Zoom, Google Meet, Microsoft Teams, WebEx, etc., give you the ability to mute meeting participants, there are times when participants need to engage in the conversation. 

Krisp goes one step further than most meeting applications by eliminating background noises while at the same time allowing open conversation.  From our experience, Krisp is also superior to some of the background noise cancellation applications available within some meeting applications.  If you participate in multiple meeting platforms, Krisp is a seamless way to use one application for everything.

Krisp is easy to install and use.  It is referred to as a “one-button” app because it is either on or off.  The desktop application works with Windows and Mac OS.  Krisp also has a Chrome extension, which expands its ability to be used with numerous other communication apps.  Additionally, Krisp supports hundreds of meeting platforms such as Zoom, Google Meets, WebEx, Microsoft Teams, Skype, Slack, etc., and it does not have any special hardware requirements.

For those who only need limited weekly meeting or recording time, Krisp’s free version gives you 120 minutes a week of noise-canceling usage.  For those who need more time, there is a “Pro” version that starts with a 14-day free trial and converts to a paid version of $5 per month afterward (billed annually).  The Krisp Pro provides unlimited noise-canceling usage and works on up to three devices. 

Another advantage of trying and using Krisp is their current referral program.  This programallows you to share a referral link with friends and colleagues.  It gives each referral one free month of Krisp Pro.  It also provides the referrer two free months of Krisp Pro.  The more friends and colleagues you refer, who use the service, the more free months of Krisp Pro you receive.  For more details about the Krisp Referral Program, go to https://help.krisp.ai/hc/en-us/articles/360017349520-Free-Pro-months-with-Krisp-Referral-program.

Are you ready to eliminate the stress of unwanted background noise from your meetings and recordings?  If so, go to https://youtu.be/JgUomX5uZpA to view the video on how Krisp.ai could work for you. If you like what you see and want to get started with Krisp, you can go to https://krisp.ai/ to sign up or use the following referral link https://ref.krisp.ai/u/u95524a350 to receive one free month of Krisp Pro.   Note:  The referral link to Krisp Pro is provided under the referral program mentioned in this article and is available at no extra cost to you. 

© 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox.com

MURAL

Are you looking for a collaboration tool which will allow your classroom teams to work remotely by brainstorming, designing, and planning project ideas using visual tools and flowcharts?  If so, then MURAL may be the tool for your classroom environment. 

Teachers and students can use MURAL as a dynamic way to present material, encourage class participation and increase student engagement.  MURAL can be used for solo or group project organization and presentations.  MURAL is an interactive planning and mind mapping software, which encourages collaboration and creativity.  Think of MURAL as a blank canvas or  whiteboard where users can draw or type ideas and add visual images or videos.  MURAL works across many desktop, iOS, and mobile platforms in both synchronous and asynchronous learning environments.  During project collaboration, many ideas can be shared with the group and then the individual group members have the opportunity to choose their favorite idea.     

MURAL provides the opportunity for faculty/student interaction and student/student interaction.  Faculty have the ability to visibly monitor the progress made on and the individual contributions to group projects.  MURAL has greatly increased the comfort level of our students working within team environments.  This virtual team experience skillset transfers easily into other courses and into the workplace.      

In addition, MURAL provides a safe space to be creative.  Your data is safeguarded with state-of-the-art security practices.  This environment provides users the ability to share data and ideas in a safe online space.  

MURAL for Education provides a free starter account for teachers, which can aid in the delivery of course content, promote collaboration, and increase student engagement.  In addition, support help is built into each feature.  Furthermore, free templates and tutorial guides are available to spark your creativity.  To get started or learn more about MURAL visit   https://www.mural.co/education.

  © 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Would You Like to Have A Second Monitor Without the Cost?

Would you like to have dual monitors without a significant investment?  Duet Display may be just the answer! 

Duet Display is an app that allows you to connect your computer to your smart device (tablet or phone) as a second monitor. Originally created by ex-Apple developers for professional use, Duet Display also works great for a home office, remote work, or the classroom. Basically, any place you want a portable second monitor. Markus and I both use multiple monitors.  We have found that dual monitors are a great way to manage multiple processes as well as increase productivity and efficiency.

For just $9.99, the Duet Display download connects Windows, iOS and/or Android devices.  I use Duet Display to make my iPad Pro 12” tablet a second monitor for my Surface Pro.

Duet Display is as simple as 1-2-3 to set up (wired or wireless) and easy to use.  To create a wired connection between my Surface and my iPad, I use a lightening to USB cable.  A wired connection is useful when Wi-Fi may not be available or when your Wi-Fi signal is low.  For a wireless connection, just follow the app instructions to pair devices.

To learn more about Duet Display or to get started using it, go to https://www.duetdisplay.com/.  You will also need to download the Duet Display app from your smart device app store.

© 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Futureproof Employees and Students with Data Analytics Training.

“We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten.  Don’t let yourself be lulled into inaction.” ~Bill Gates~

Are you feeling a bit overwhelmed when you hear or read about disruptive technology changes coming to the field of Accounting?  If so, you are not alone.  We hear terms like AI (Artificial Intelligence), ML (Machine Learning), RPA (Robotic Process Automation), AR (Augmented Reality), VR (Virtual Reality), Mixed Reality, Blockchain, Big Data, Data Analytics, Data Visualization, 3-D Printing-Additive Manufacturing, and IoT (The Internet of Things). We are told that these disruptive technologies will impact the future of accounting, but do we really need to worry about this now?  The answer is yes!  Changes in technology is going to disrupt the future of the accounting workplace and the time to adapt is now.  The future is here!

Download to read the remainder of our article that was published in the July/August 2020 edition of the MOCPA Asset Magazine.

Accessibility – Free Technology Tools and Tips for Compliance

During Spring 2020, COVID-19 forced many face-to-face courses to shift to remote learning abruptly. This shift posed numerous challenges for instructors, including how to provide accessible course content. While the pandemic forced institutions and instructors to be flexible or even allowed short-term exceptions for specific requirements; accessibility standards were not waived.  Instructors were still responsible for making sure that their courses were accessible and in compliance.  Markus and I recognize that complying with accessibility requirements can feel a bit overwhelming. Therefore, we want to share a few tips to demystify the concept of accessibility as well as provide some free tools to simplify making your asynchronous and synchronous courses compliant.

Let’s start by discussing accessibility best practices.  First, a common thought is that accessibility requirements only need to be met if students request accommodations.  In reality, remote courses need to be accessible even if no student accommodations are in place.  Regardless of the delivery format (asynchronous vs. synchronous), there are several accessibility best practices to consider:

  • Course design – We recommend that you use a simple and consistent format. Take a few minutes to look at your course through multiple lenses.  Ask yourself, if you could not hear, see, or had other disabilities, could you successfully navigate this course?  If not, make the appropriate changes.
  • Communication – It is important to make sure your instructions are clear for all course activities. Remember, in a remote environment, you will not be as readily available to your students as you might have been in the classroom. Ask yourself, if you did not know anything about the presented materials, would you know what to do?  If not, add the appropriate clarification.
  • Learning Management System (LMS) Tools – Most LMS systems (i.e., Blackboard, Canvas, Moodle, etc.) have built-in accessibility support tools. Be sure to use these when they are available. These tools and resources will simplify the task of making your course compliant.
  • Third-Party Applications – Do you use third-party tools? Homework managers, or other applications?  If so, are these third-party applications accessible?  If not, you may consider using different resources.  Third-party applications that are accessible will have an accessibility statement.
  • Hyperlinks – It is important to describe any hyperlinks used in your course. Avoid using generic terms for links, such as “Assignment,” “Quiz,” etc.  The link should describe the activity and its content, such as “Chapter 2 Assignment”.
  • Images – It is also essential to use descriptions that clearly describe all images shown in your course. If possible, avoid using images just for decoration.  All images should have a purpose and add value to the learning experience.
  • Font – The bigger the font, the better. San serif fonts are the best for accessibility. Additionally, Word documents should typically use a font that is 14-point or larger, and PowerPoint slides should use a font 24-point or greater.
  • Color – When using color in your course, always consider color-blind students or those who are visually impaired. It is best to use contrasting colors, whenever possible.  Avoid red and green, but if you must use these colors, try to use darker versions for clarity.  Colors like blue and orange tend to be better.
  • Captions – Captioning your course content is one of the biggest challenges or concerns for many instructors. It is perceived to be very time-consuming. Additionally, there is often the misconception that captioning is just for students who are hearing impaired. However, captioning can be helpful for a variety of other students as well. For example, ELS/ELL students (English Language Learners).

Markus and I are often asked the question, “Where do we start?”  There are several free tools available for you to use.  Some of these tools you already use on a regular basis.

Microsoft Office

Microsoft Office provides a free accessibility checker tool that can be used with Excel, OneNote, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Word.  This accessibility tool is available for Office Online, as well as Windows and Mac users.

Word and PowerPoint are probably the best-known applications that allow you to create and share accessible documents.  Accessibility features in Word and PowerPoint can be turned on for accessibility checking while you work, or you can verify accessibility before saving the document.  The Microsoft accessibility checker not only verifies accessibility; it also provides recommendations for compliance, such as inserting alternative text (Alt Text) for images and properly formatting headings.  When creating accessible Word documents, avoid using features such as SmartArt, text boxes, headers, and footers.  When creating accessible PowerPoints, consider selecting a template that offers contrasting colors and avoid using the Design Ideas feature.  While some Design Ideas templates are compliant, many others are not.

PDF

PDFs are another way to share accessible documents.  If you have the professional version of Adobe Acrobat, you can use the accessibility check feature for any documents (created by you or others).  To create an accessible PDF, Markus and I recommend that you start with an accessible Word document. It is important to use the “Save As” feature to convert your Word document to a PDF, rather than printing the document to a PDF.  The “Save As” option helps retain the original accessibility features in your new document.  Most accessible Word documents easily convert to an accessible PDF; however, it is always a good idea to double-check the accessibility of your new document for accessibility and make modifications as needed.

Videos and Virtual Meetings

Course videos and virtual course meetings also need to meet accessibility guidelines.  Videos should be captioned, visual content needs to be described using Alt Text, and video players need to be user-accessible by mouse and keyboard.  Video controls should be appropriately labeled so that screen reader users can access all the video features. A few of the video players that support accessible content include YouTube, Vimeo, and Panopto. You may find Panopto as a free feature in your school’s LMS.

Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR)

Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology is continuously improving, but the technology is still not 100% accurate.  Accuracy of converting speech to text can be affected in various ways, including excessive background noise, the speaker’s accent, voice tone, or volume.  If you use a script to record your videos, then you already have your captioning transcript created.  If you do not use a script, there are several free captioning options available.  Regardless of the captioning method you use, it is essential to review your captions and make corrections as needed.

Closed-Captioning vs. Live-Captioning

Asynchronous courses typically use closed captioning.  Alternatively, live-captioning is generally used with synchronous courses since it happens in real-time.  Closed-captions allow course participants to opt-in or opt-out of displaying the caption. In contrast, live-captioning is always displayed, for all participants. Closed captioning is easy to translate into multiple languages, and captions can be modified.  In comparison, live-captioning is typically available only in one language and cannot be modified or saved.  Not all platforms support closed captioning, but accessible video players like YouTube, Vimeo, and Panopto do.

The accuracy standard for closed-captioning is higher than for live-. For closed captioning, the goal is 99% to 100% accuracy rate.  Markus and I have found that verifying video captioning accuracy is quick and easy when you record shorter videos (less than 15 minutes). Shorter videos also are more engaging for students, so it is a win-win!

Live-captioning standards strive for the highest level of accuracy considered reasonable under the circumstances.  Using technology tools that have a high speech to text accuracy level dramatically improves the quality of the live-captioning experience for students.  Technology tools like PowerPoint, Google Doc/Slides, G Suite – Google Meet, Microsoft Teams, and Zoom all have live-captioning options.  As previously mentioned, usually, live-captioning cannot be saved for future use, but Zoom’s “closed-captioning” feature does have the ability to archive live session captions.

The topic of accessibility may still feel a bit overwhelming, but once you find your tools and perfect your processes, accessibility compliance can be very manageable.  Do not forget to use your Disability Services and Distance Learning offices for support and assistance.   They can be great resources.  An accessibility resource for web content that may also be useful is the WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines) Quick Reference.

©2020 TeachingAndLearningToolbox.com

 

 

Improve Your Virtual Meeting and Classroom Presentations

Toolbox

With the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us have been communicating fully or at least partially within a virtual environment.  Virtual delivery has allowed us to continue to connect and collaborate with students and co-workers while maintaining social distancing practices.  Throughout the past several months, we all have encountered good and poor virtual experiences, including meeting and screen fatigue.  Cathy and I have reflected on our personal experiences and we decided to identify some virtual delivery best practices.

First, make sure that you have the correct equipment to effectively deliver your course or meeting content.  This includes having a reliable web camera, and luckily, most laptops and tablets have adequate built in web cameras.  If you prefer a higher quality camera or if you have a desktop, many external web cameras are available at very reasonable price points.  In addition, sufficient internet speed to support streaming content and video is required.  Many households have implemented a family internet usage calendar to avoid too many devices streaming content during the same time of an important virtual meeting.  To improve privacy during virtual delivery, Cathy and I suggest using a headset or a pair of earphones.  Many listening options are available depending on how much someone wants to spend on this option.  Cathy and I prefer wireless options like Apple AirPods or the Anker Liberty Air.  The final piece of equipment that we have invested in is a quality microphone for recorded presentations.  Cathy and I prefer the Blue Yeti microphone, which is available with a desk stand or a boom arm.  To further reduce microphone noise and acoustic transparency, an optional pop filter can be placed in front of the Blue Yeti microphone.

After you are assured that your equipment can support the delivery of your meeting or course, there are other great practices that should be observed.

  • Prepare Yourself Ahead of Time and Incorporate Some Transition Time – Make sure to mindfully transition from all other tasks before you deliver or participate in a virtual meeting. Make sure to close other apps and browsers to increase internet speed and to help reduce distractions.  In addition, it is important to get into the correct mindset before the virtual meeting begins.  Cathy and I suggest reviewing the course topics or meeting agenda for a few minutes before the start of the virtual meeting.  Decide if you are going to stand or sit during the virtual presentation.  If you normally stand when you teach, we suggest that you stand during the virtual presentation.  Also, make sure that your lighting is adequate for others to see you during the presentation.  Test your video camera and the lighting before your meeting begins.  Furthermore, make sure that all screens that you plan to share during the meeting are ready to view on your device.
  • Don’t Do Too Much at Once – Typically, it will take longer to cover material in a virtual environment compared to when we meet in person. Consider covering less material and allowing more time for questions and conversation.  Online delivery models require more repetition and additional time for discussion.  PowerPoint can work well with presentation organization and delivery, but we should avoid putting too much material on individual slides.  PowerPoint can help facilitate keeping meetings and classes on track, but the slides should include only the main discussion items.  In addition, try to avoid having long virtual meetings or classes.  We as humans can only stay engaged virtually for a certain period of time.
  • Set Some Ground Rules – Participants should develop a habit of muting themselves when they are not talking. To avoid everyone talking at once, a process to ask questions or contribute to the discussion should be in place.  Utilizing the chat or raising your hand features are great practices to insure a fair an equitable process for everyone to have a voice during the meeting.  Decide ahead of time if all participants will be required to have their camera on during the entire meeting or only when they speak.  Cathy and I like the human element in our virtual classroom environments and it is more engaging when students have their cameras are on.  At a minimum, everyone should introduce themselves at the beginning of the semester (or meeting) and then state their name when they ask questions.
  • Increase Engagement – Cathy and I cannot stress enough that engagement during virtual delivery is essential. We utilize polling software to insure that our students are participating and understanding the material being presented.  Poll Everywhere, Kahoot, Mentimeter, Socrative, GoSoapBox, and Nearpod can be used for virtual meeting polling activities.  In addition, we use online breakout rooms to promote smaller group discussions.
  • Finish Strong– We should always end our virtual meetings with either an overview of what was covered or what still needs to be completed. Many times, we can ask everyone for closing thoughts, what they learned, or what they still are confused about before they exit the meeting.  The online chat feature or polling options can help facilitate the end of the meeting discussion.

Cathy and I are always trying to improve our classroom delivery and student engagement.  Our goal is to provide others the techniques and technology tools that have been successful in enhancing the student learning experience within our on-campus and virtual classroom environments.  Hopefully, our best practices will help with your virtual meeting and course delivery planning process.

 

© 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

GoSoapBox In Review: Taking Student Engagement To A New Level

GoSoapBox In Review: Taking Student Engagement To A New Level

Occasionally, Markus and I receive a request to revisit a previous technology tool, so this month we will be looking at GoSoapBox In Review.

If you are looking to enhance your current classroom response system, you might consider GoSoapBox. GoSoapBox is a powerful multi-function tool that can help you engage students as well as conduct formative assessments to evaluate students understanding of course concepts.

GoSoapBox events help you gain real-time insight into student comprehension with several useful tools, such as (1) Social Q&A, (2) Confusion Barometer, (3) Quizzes, (4) Polls, and (5) Discussions. Let’s briefly look at each of these GoSoapBox features.

Social Q&A: Social Q&A is a way to manage student questions that you do not have time to answer in class. Social Q&A is a technology feature that is similar to a student raising their hand in class but without the disruption. As questions are posted, other students can determine which questions are also most important to them. This lets the instructor know what questions to address in class, which is especially useful when class time is limited.  After class, you can also post answers to the questions that were not covered in class.  With GoSoapBox, you can easily address all student questions, in or out of class, which supports all students throughout the course.

Confusion Barometer: The Confusion Barometer is a feature that lets students communicate when they are confused or when they need the instructor to slow down on a topic discussion.  GoSoapBox engages even the quietest voice in the class, especially when the anonymity feature is enabled.  The instructor sees a visual representation that identifies the number of students who are confused, compared to the number of students who understand.  It is always better to know early in the learning process that a student is off-track, rather than find out later, such as on an exam.

Quizzes: The Quizzes features let the instructor created multiple-choice or short answer questions. Students can take the quizzes either during or outside of class. Results can be exported into a spreadsheet to analyze student performance or apply points to the grade book. Quizzes are a great formative assessment tool to identify what students understand or may need to review further.

Polls: Similar to clicker devices and other polling technology, such as Polleverywhere (September 2018, August 2015), the GoSoapBox Polls feature engage students in course lectures and activities while displaying results in real-time.

Discussions: Discussions allow instructors to create topics for students to research and debate.  Discussion can be set up where participants can post anonymously or where student responses can be identified for grading.  The anonymous feature in GoSoapBox is easy to deploy by a discussion event.

For the instructor, GoSoapBox makes it easy to export data to a spreadsheet, capturing data for the entire class or by individual students.  GoSoapBox’s reporting feature makes it easy to identify students who may be getting off track or confirm which students have a solid understanding of the material.

GoSoapBox is compatible with all web browsers and most devices. It is easy for students to join using an event code. Best of all, GoSoapBox is free for smaller classes (30 or less), but upgrades are available for larger class sizes.

If you are excited to explore this fantastic tech tool, you can take a tour of GoSoapBox at https://www.gosoapbox.com/tour or sign up for your free account at https://www.gosoapbox.com/signup.

©2020 TeachingAndLearningToolbox.com