2021 Year End Review

With COVID-19 still hanging around, many of us are ready for 2021 to end and we look forward to a healthy 2022.  At this time of year, we feel that it is a great opportunity to reflect upon the fantastic technology tools and topics that we explored throughout 2021.  A great resolution for 2022 is to integrate at least one new tool into your classroom environment.

Wakelet (Collaboration)https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/01/

Microsoft Clipping Tool https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/02/

Ziplet (Student Feedback)https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/03/

Zoom Classroom Lecture Recordingshttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/04/

Soundtrap (Podcasting & Collaboration)https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/05/

Teaching in Hyflex and Blended Learning Environments  – https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/06/

Canva (Collaboration) https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/07/

Let’s Get Ready for the New Academic Year – https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/08/

CountThings (Image Recognition & Machine Learning)https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/09/

Chrome Extensions (Momentum, Kami, InsertLearning, Google Keep, Just Read)https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/10/31/

Google Lens https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2021/11/30/

We look forward to exploring more teaching and learning technology tools throughout 2022.

© 2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Increase Your Efficiency in the Classroom with Chrome Browser Extensions

With Chrome’s market dominance, many of us use the Chrome browser on a daily basis.  To improve your productivity and efficiency within your classroom environment, Cathy and I suggest exploring a few of the many Chrome extensions.  We recommend starting with the following innovative extensions: 

  • Momentum

Momentum is a free extension that can help add focus to your day.  Join over 10 million users who are utilizing Momentum as an all-in-one productivity tool.  Momentum sends friendly reminders of your important tasks, links, daily focus, and more.  Momentum will help you start and end each day focused on the task at hand.

  • Kami

Kami is the world’s number one digital classroom tool with complete assignment workflow.  Kami allows you to annotate and transform any document into an interactive learning space.  You and your students can collaborate in real-time through live annotations, video and audio recordings, drawings, and more.  Kami provides tools to support many learning styles, helps increase student engagement, and helps improve learning outcomes.  Teachers can spend more time with their students and less time on grading.  Kami allows you to provide feedback, grade, and push student work straight from your preferred LMS, including Google Classroom, Canvas, Schoology, and Microsoft Teams.

  • InsertLearning

InsertLearning allows educators to insert instructional content on any web page, which can save teachers and students time while helping keep students engaged.  Instructors have access to insert questions, sticky notes, discussions, and videos directly into any website.  When students go to that website, they can respond to those questions and discussions, see the videos, and take their own notes.  Also, InsertLearning has a feature that will allow students to engage each other in real-time.  Use InsertLearning to turn any website into an interactive learning experience.

  • Google Keep

Google Keep is a free, simple, and effective productivity and collaboration tool for both students and instructors.  If you want to be more organized, productive, and collaborative, Google Keep captures your notes and ideas, provides a collaborative sharing resource, and offers a great To Do List feature.  See our Google Keep (March 2019) Tip of the Month for more information.

  • Just Read

Just Read is a feature-packed and customizable reader view app.  With Just Read, you can reformat cluttered websites into cleaner, easy-to-read documents.  Just Read allows you to easily eliminate advertisements, popups, comments, and other web clutter when you pull content from web pages.  The finished product is a simplified, clean, and readable document that can be distributed to students.

To learn more about the many “free” Chrome extensions, click  https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/extensions

© 2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Let’s Get Ready for the New Academic Year!

At this time of year, we as educators begin to organize ourselves and make plans for the upcoming semester.  The COVID-19 pandemic forced many educators to utilize technology to deliver quality education.    This a great time to reflect on what worked well in a virtual environment and utilize technology that can help organize yourself and your classroom for the upcoming year.   Where should you start?  Cathy and I think that this is the perfect time to share how we stay organized and to recap some of our favorite and most useful technology tools.

To maintain easy access to our documents from anywhere or any device, Cathy and I utilize Dropbox for document cloud storage.  In addition, Dropbox allows us to easily share documents with anyone.  Other cloud storage services that we recommend are Google Drive, Microsoft One Drive, and Apple iCloud.

In addition, a great note taking app is a must have for increasing productivity.  Both Notability and Evernote are tools that we utilize on a weekly basis.  Additional note taking tools that we recommend are GoodNotes, Google Keep, Notion, Microsoft OneNote, and Apple Notes.

Furthermore, Cathy and I utilize technology to convert our typical classroom into an interactive whiteboard environment.  Doceri allows our hand held devices to project images through the classroom overhead projector and to record our lectures.  Zoom has also become a great presentation tool for Cathy and myself.  Additional whiteboard and/or lecture capture technology that we recommend are Explain Everything, Educreations, ShowMe, Notability, Splashtop, Jamboard, Stormboard, Camtasia, Tegrity, Snagit, Microsoft Teams and Microsoft Whiteboard.

To increase student engagement in the classroom environment, Cathy and I utilize several polling and gamification technologies.  Poll Everywhere, Kahoot, Piazza, Sli.do, Socrative, Ziplet, Peergrade, and Mertimeter are a few of our favorite polling options.  These  student engagement technologies work great for on campus or online learning environments.

Cathy and I integrate many group team activities into our course curriculums.  Some of the technologies that we use to support the group workflow and grading are:  Canva, Soundtrap, Mural, GoSoapBox, Google Keep, Slack, and Microsoft Teams.  Another technology option to consider for team communication is Group Me.

If you are looking for technologies to introduce data analytics into your curriculum, Tableau and PowerBI are very user friendly tools.  In addition, Cathy and I describe how we introduce data analytics into our curriculum and our approach was published in an August 2020 article.

Finally, Cathy and I try to utilize technology to engage our students outside of our classroom lectures.  Some effective technology tools that we use to accomplish student engagement are: Wakelet, Kahoot Challenge, Flipgrid, Google Slides, and Recap.

We hope that you take this opportunity to discover at least one technology that can help you become more organized throughout the upcoming year.  We recommend checking with your institution to see if they currently provide any of these technologies at little or no cost to faculty.  Many technologies provide similar benefits; therefore, we identified several tools within each organizational category listed above.  We suggest utilizing tools that compliment your teaching style and that can be acquired for the least amount of resources.  Good luck and have a great academic year.

© 2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Teaching in HyFlex and Blended Learning Environments

The COVID-19 pandemic forced many educators, including Cathy and myself, into teaching in virtual learning environments.  Since the goal was to keep students and faculty safe from COVID-19, some us were introduced to new teaching models.

First, we need to define our teaching and learning models (NOTE: Some schools use different terms for these models).

LVL: Live Virtual Lecture

Hybrid: Students watch/prepare outside of class and then have a live component

Blended: (Live-Combined) On-campus in class students and LVL

HyFlex: Blended + Asynchronous option

NOTE: In a prior Teaching and Learning Toolbox Tip of the Monthpost we discussed several organization tips to aid in delivering a quality virtual lecture. https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/06/

In this post, we want to address the complexities and challenges of teaching in a HyFlex learning environment.  In any learning model, but especially the HyFlex model, we need to address the following items:

Image created by Amanda White – University of Technology Sydney – Australia

Similar to the Blended learning model, one of the biggest challenges in HyFlex is managing the people (students) in the live classroom and in the LVL.  How are LVL students allowed to ask questions?  Instructors need to decide if LVL students will use the chat feature, raise their hand and be called upon, or just unmute themselves and ask their question.  There is often a delay in questions from the LVL students while they type in chat or by the time that it takes for an instructor to see a virtual hand raised.  The interactions with the LVL students, many times will disrupt the flow of the class.  Some instructors have found that subdividing their classroom into separate in-person student question and LVL student question periods help with their classroom organization.  Furthermore, it is vital that the faculty teaching in Blended and HyFlex learning models receive appropriate training to teach in these models.  Training is required for both pedagogy and for the technology used in the course delivery.

Many times, having the appropriate technology and understanding of how to effectively use it can be the biggest challenge for instructors.  The pandemic forced institutions to quickly change course delivery models mid-semester.  Many students, faculty, and schools did not have the appropriate technology to support the new learning models.  At some institutions, students and faculty were loaned equipment and resources to accommodate the new classroom environment.  In several situations, the loaned equipment was too old or too scarce to provide a successful transition for the students and faculty.  Many individuals were forced to purchase new equipment themselves to adjust and assist with this new style of learning.

In the HyFlex learning environment, classrooms need to be equipped with multiple cameras, multiple microphones, innovative computer stations, and maybe even a document camera.  The biggest challenge in the HyFlex delivery is managing the equipment and technology.  Many times, the instructor feels more like a movie producer instead of a teacher.  Managing the LVL and in-class students, while producing an asynchronous recording can be difficult to achieve.  Furthermore, the school may have significant firewalls that prevent access to certain material to the LVL students.  I encountered issues with trying to show a short video in class.  The LVL and asynchronous recording could only receive the audio feed, since the video feed was blocked by a firewall.  Most of the time, I brought my own laptop to the classroom to avoid similar issues.  The best option is if the instructor has a separate person (teaching or graduate assistant) to run the equipment and technology while the instructor concentrates on teaching.  Cathy and I do not have this option, therefore, we have asked in-person students to monitor the chat for questions.  Furthermore, pausing and restarting your asynchronous recordings can be an additional challenge.  Cathy and I try not to have extensive recorded idle time when students are working on in-class exercises.  In addition, many times we will pause the recording when students ask questions.  In our experience, students ask questions more freely when they know that they are not being recorded.  After we answer the live student questions, we will restart the video recording and summarize the question and answer portion of the course.  We have received positive feedback from our in-class students because the recorded summaries help them with their notetaking.

Unfortunately, we have found that Institutional Workload Policy regarding HyFlex is not consistent.  Many schools will count a HyFlex course as one course load and other schools recognize the complexity of teaching this model, and will consider it as two or three course loads.  The HyFlex model is a tremendous amount of work and when institutions treat it the same as a normal in-class lecture course load, it can be unfair to the instructor.  The size of the class section and the level of support from the school can further complicate teaching in this learning model.  We encourage everyone to fully understand the challenges in teaching in the HyFlex classroom model, including how you will be compensated, before starting this endeavor.      

Cathy and I cannot stress enough that being organized and consistent is essential to successfully teaching in the HyFlex learning model.  Students require consistent structure and they do not react well when the rules get changed throughout the semester.  Also, keeping the students engaged can be an issue.  To increase engagement, we use polling questions and breakout rooms in our virtual learning environments.  Students appear to enjoy the flexibility of the HyFlex learning model.  But, be prepared for students switching modes of delivery during the semester within the HyFlex environment.  Some institutions require students to stay in the same mode of delivery throughout the entire semester, but many schools allow students to choose their mode of delivery on a weekly basis.  With COVID-19, I had students that were forced to switch delivery modes due to quarantine requirements.  Luckily, the HyFlex model allowed the students to fully participate and successfully complete the course during their quarantine period. 

© 2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Using Zoom for Classroom Lecture Recordings

During 2020, many educators, including Cathy and myself, were displaced from our campus classrooms due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Most of us were required to quickly adopt technologies and create virtual learning environments.  As we begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel and the possibility of returning to pre-pandemic classroom environments, we would like to reflect on some improved lecture recording practices utilizing Zoom.  

For several years, Cathy and I have used Doceri  https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2019/10/ as an affordable classroom lecture recording technology tool.  We both have been avid users of the Doceri software while utilizing our Apple I-Pads and Microsoft Surface Pros when we lecture in our classrooms.  Throughout the pandemic, Cathy and I began experimenting with Zoom to record our lectures for students to view on their own time. 

Before someone begins recording classroom lectures, we encourage them to view the following two prior Teaching and Learning Toolbox “Tip of the Month” posts.  In the first post, we discuss many organizational tips to aid in delivering a quality video lecture.  The second post addresses the basic Zoom safety and security functions.

1- Improve Your Virtual Meetings & Classroom Presentations – https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/06/

2 – Zoom – https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/04/

In addition, we always recommend using the most current version of Zoom. This will insure that you are using the most secure version and that you have access to all updated features.

Now, let’s examine the steps to using Zoom to record a lecture.

  • After you start your Zoom meeting, you will need to test and make sure that your microphone and video are working properly.  The microphone Mute and Start Video buttons are available in the bottom information bar on the far left side.
  • If you want to record a PowerPoint presentation or other documents, you will need to click the Share button located in the bottom information bar.  You need to have the document that you want to share open on your desktop.  You will have the opportunity to choose the document to display during the lecture after you select the Share button.
  • To begin recording your lecture, click the More button at the top of the Zoom window.
  • Choose the Record on this Computer option from the drop-down menu. NOTE: If you did not share your screen, the Record/Pause/Stop Recording buttons will be located in the bottom Zoom information bar.
  • You have the option to Pause Recording or Stop Recording throughout the lecture.  Cathy and I utilize the Pause Recording function to avoid extensive idle time when students are working on group exercises or if there are sensitive subject matters being discussed.  Many times we will un-pause the recording and then summarize the discussion that just took place in the live classroom environment. NOTE: Pausing the recording and then resuming the recording will result in one video recording.  Stopping a recording and then starting a recording will result in multiple videos.  Every time that a recording is stopped, it completely ends that video recording.
  • When you are finished recording, click on the More button and then choose End from the drop down menu. NOTE: If you did not share your screen, the End button will be located in the bottom Zoom information bar.
  • After you select End, you will need to select End Meeting for All.
  • Your recordings will automatically begin converting to .mp4 formatted videos.
  • Zoom automatically saves your recorded lecture files in a folder named Zoom within your computer’s Documents area.  This location should automatically open when the recordings are finished processing.  In addition, the files will be sorted by recording date.  We suggest renaming the video files before you post them into your Learning Management System.

Additional Note: Cathy and I Share documents in Zoom and mark on them utilizing our I-Pads and Surface Pro’s pencils.  These marked up documents are captured within our classroom session recordings.  Furthermore, Cathy and I upload our .mp4 Zoom recordings into our YouTube channels as unlisted videos and then we share the YouTube link in our Learning Management Systems.  This allows our students to view the videos outside of our Learning Management System, resulting in less buffering issues and increased compatibility with our student’s mobile devices.

Do you need more help using Zoom?  We suggest checking out these great Zoom created video tutorials:  https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/206618765-Zoom-Video-Tutorials?_ga=2.47859235.520390637.1586184035-254639170.1585840704

To learn more about Zoom and to set up your free account, click https://zoom.us/.

© 2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Microsoft Snipping Tool

With the adjustments to our classroom environment caused by COVID-19, most of us have been forced to be much more creative and resourceful.  Throughout the past year, Cathy and I have had to create many teaching tools for our virtual and online learning environments.  From creating practice exercise templates and visual aids to help increase student engagement, we have utilized Microsoft’s snipping tool.  This free tool has added efficiency to creating our learning resources. This is a tool that we have used for years, but recently we were asked about recommending good “clip and paste” tools. 

Some of the reasons that we like to use the Microsoft snipping tool are:

  • This is a tool that is free and easy to use and is part of the Windows Operating System
  • A user can edit the clipped snapshots
  • Snipping Tool allows a user to write on the screen capture and save it
  • Captured images can be stored in many formats
  • After capturing the screen, it automatically gets copied and it can be immediately pasted into a document

The free Windows Snipping Tool allows users to do the following:

Free-form snipDraw a free-form shape around an object.
Rectangular snipDrag the cursor around an object to form a rectangle.
Window snipSelect a window, such as a dialog box, that you want to capture.
Full-screen snipCapture the entire screen.

There are several ways to begin using the Microsoft snipping tool, but the easiest way is to select the Shift, Windows button and the “S” keys.

For more information about the Microsoft clipping tool, visit:   https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/use-snipping-tool-to-capture-screenshots-00246869-1843-655f-f220-97299b865f6b

In addition to the free Windows snipping tool, we suggest using

  •  Or the print screen function and then pasting it into paint.

Begin using one of these snipping tools today and immediately improve your efficiency in creating documents for your classroom.

  © 2021 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

2020 Year End Review

Many of us are ready for 2020 to end and to turn the page to 2021.  As our semester and 2020 come to a close, we feel that it is a great opportunity to reflect upon the fantastic technology tools and topics that we explored throughout the year.  A great resolution for 2021 is to integrate one new tool into your classroom environment.

Mentimeterhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/01/

Grammarly https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/02/

Remote Learning Tools for Successhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/03/

Zoomhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/04/

Go Soap Boxhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/05/

Improve Your Virtual Meetings & Classroom Presentationshttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/06/

Accessibility Compliance Tools https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/07/31/

Futureproof Employees and Students with Data Analytics Training – https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/08/31/

Duet (Second Monitor Without a Cost)https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/09/30/

MURALhttps://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/10/

Krisp for Noise Free Meetings & Recordings https://teachingandlearningtoolbox.wordpress.com/2020/11/

We look forward to exploring more teaching and learning technology tools throughout 2021.

© 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

MURAL

Are you looking for a collaboration tool which will allow your classroom teams to work remotely by brainstorming, designing, and planning project ideas using visual tools and flowcharts?  If so, then MURAL may be the tool for your classroom environment. 

Teachers and students can use MURAL as a dynamic way to present material, encourage class participation and increase student engagement.  MURAL can be used for solo or group project organization and presentations.  MURAL is an interactive planning and mind mapping software, which encourages collaboration and creativity.  Think of MURAL as a blank canvas or  whiteboard where users can draw or type ideas and add visual images or videos.  MURAL works across many desktop, iOS, and mobile platforms in both synchronous and asynchronous learning environments.  During project collaboration, many ideas can be shared with the group and then the individual group members have the opportunity to choose their favorite idea.     

MURAL provides the opportunity for faculty/student interaction and student/student interaction.  Faculty have the ability to visibly monitor the progress made on and the individual contributions to group projects.  MURAL has greatly increased the comfort level of our students working within team environments.  This virtual team experience skillset transfers easily into other courses and into the workplace.      

In addition, MURAL provides a safe space to be creative.  Your data is safeguarded with state-of-the-art security practices.  This environment provides users the ability to share data and ideas in a safe online space.  

MURAL for Education provides a free starter account for teachers, which can aid in the delivery of course content, promote collaboration, and increase student engagement.  In addition, support help is built into each feature.  Furthermore, free templates and tutorial guides are available to spark your creativity.  To get started or learn more about MURAL visit   https://www.mural.co/education.

  © 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox

Futureproof Employees and Students with Data Analytics Training.

“We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten.  Don’t let yourself be lulled into inaction.” ~Bill Gates~

Are you feeling a bit overwhelmed when you hear or read about disruptive technology changes coming to the field of Accounting?  If so, you are not alone.  We hear terms like AI (Artificial Intelligence), ML (Machine Learning), RPA (Robotic Process Automation), AR (Augmented Reality), VR (Virtual Reality), Mixed Reality, Blockchain, Big Data, Data Analytics, Data Visualization, 3-D Printing-Additive Manufacturing, and IoT (The Internet of Things). We are told that these disruptive technologies will impact the future of accounting, but do we really need to worry about this now?  The answer is yes!  Changes in technology is going to disrupt the future of the accounting workplace and the time to adapt is now.  The future is here!

Download to read the remainder of our article that was published in the July/August 2020 edition of the MOCPA Asset Magazine.

Improve Your Virtual Meeting and Classroom Presentations

Toolbox

With the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us have been communicating fully or at least partially within a virtual environment.  Virtual delivery has allowed us to continue to connect and collaborate with students and co-workers while maintaining social distancing practices.  Throughout the past several months, we all have encountered good and poor virtual experiences, including meeting and screen fatigue.  Cathy and I have reflected on our personal experiences and we decided to identify some virtual delivery best practices.

First, make sure that you have the correct equipment to effectively deliver your course or meeting content.  This includes having a reliable web camera, and luckily, most laptops and tablets have adequate built in web cameras.  If you prefer a higher quality camera or if you have a desktop, many external web cameras are available at very reasonable price points.  In addition, sufficient internet speed to support streaming content and video is required.  Many households have implemented a family internet usage calendar to avoid too many devices streaming content during the same time of an important virtual meeting.  To improve privacy during virtual delivery, Cathy and I suggest using a headset or a pair of earphones.  Many listening options are available depending on how much someone wants to spend on this option.  Cathy and I prefer wireless options like Apple AirPods or the Anker Liberty Air.  The final piece of equipment that we have invested in is a quality microphone for recorded presentations.  Cathy and I prefer the Blue Yeti microphone, which is available with a desk stand or a boom arm.  To further reduce microphone noise and acoustic transparency, an optional pop filter can be placed in front of the Blue Yeti microphone.

After you are assured that your equipment can support the delivery of your meeting or course, there are other great practices that should be observed.

  • Prepare Yourself Ahead of Time and Incorporate Some Transition Time – Make sure to mindfully transition from all other tasks before you deliver or participate in a virtual meeting. Make sure to close other apps and browsers to increase internet speed and to help reduce distractions.  In addition, it is important to get into the correct mindset before the virtual meeting begins.  Cathy and I suggest reviewing the course topics or meeting agenda for a few minutes before the start of the virtual meeting.  Decide if you are going to stand or sit during the virtual presentation.  If you normally stand when you teach, we suggest that you stand during the virtual presentation.  Also, make sure that your lighting is adequate for others to see you during the presentation.  Test your video camera and the lighting before your meeting begins.  Furthermore, make sure that all screens that you plan to share during the meeting are ready to view on your device.
  • Don’t Do Too Much at Once – Typically, it will take longer to cover material in a virtual environment compared to when we meet in person. Consider covering less material and allowing more time for questions and conversation.  Online delivery models require more repetition and additional time for discussion.  PowerPoint can work well with presentation organization and delivery, but we should avoid putting too much material on individual slides.  PowerPoint can help facilitate keeping meetings and classes on track, but the slides should include only the main discussion items.  In addition, try to avoid having long virtual meetings or classes.  We as humans can only stay engaged virtually for a certain period of time.
  • Set Some Ground Rules – Participants should develop a habit of muting themselves when they are not talking. To avoid everyone talking at once, a process to ask questions or contribute to the discussion should be in place.  Utilizing the chat or raising your hand features are great practices to insure a fair an equitable process for everyone to have a voice during the meeting.  Decide ahead of time if all participants will be required to have their camera on during the entire meeting or only when they speak.  Cathy and I like the human element in our virtual classroom environments and it is more engaging when students have their cameras are on.  At a minimum, everyone should introduce themselves at the beginning of the semester (or meeting) and then state their name when they ask questions.
  • Increase Engagement – Cathy and I cannot stress enough that engagement during virtual delivery is essential. We utilize polling software to insure that our students are participating and understanding the material being presented.  Poll Everywhere, Kahoot, Mentimeter, Socrative, GoSoapBox, and Nearpod can be used for virtual meeting polling activities.  In addition, we use online breakout rooms to promote smaller group discussions.
  • Finish Strong– We should always end our virtual meetings with either an overview of what was covered or what still needs to be completed. Many times, we can ask everyone for closing thoughts, what they learned, or what they still are confused about before they exit the meeting.  The online chat feature or polling options can help facilitate the end of the meeting discussion.

Cathy and I are always trying to improve our classroom delivery and student engagement.  Our goal is to provide others the techniques and technology tools that have been successful in enhancing the student learning experience within our on-campus and virtual classroom environments.  Hopefully, our best practices will help with your virtual meeting and course delivery planning process.

 

© 2020 Teaching and Learning Toolbox